Life goes on for the billions left behind after the humanity-saving colony mission to Proxima Centauri leaves Earth orbit… but what’s the point? 

 

     

Twenty-Five-To-Life-Cover-616x934.jpg

     Julie Riley is two years too young to get out from under her mother’s thumb, and what does it matter? She’s over-educated, under-employed, and kept mostly numb by her pharma emplant. Her best friend, who she’s mostly been interacting with via virtual reality for the past decade, is part of the colony mission to Proxima Centauri. Plus, the world is coming to an end. So, there’s that.

     When Julie’s mother decides it’s time to let go of the family home in a failing suburb and move to the city to be closer to work and her new beau, Julie decides to take matters into her own hands. She runs, illegally, hoping to find and hide with the Volksgeist, a loose-knit culture of tramps, hoboes, senior citizens, artists, and never-do-wells who have elected to ride out the end of the world in their campers and converted vans, constantly on the move over the back roads of America.

Available at:

“Greene creates an all too realistic world filled with very real people. A tale of growing up and what it means to be an adult, this is one not to be missed.”
– Gerald Brandt, international bestselling author of Threader Origins

“Our collective fear of being left behind, brilliantly captured. Greene nails it!”
– Jason M. Hough, New York Times bestselling author of Instinct

"Following a timeless search for individuality and meaning amid a stark and relatable future, Twenty-Five to Life explores the fine line that separates segments of society living a dystopian reality from those living a post-apocalyptic one. Engaging and memorable."
– Reese Hogan, author of Shrouded Loyalties


"Twenty Five to Life skillfully blends dystopian and post-apocalyptic literature with a moving coming-of-age story. I thoroughly enjoyed not only Greene’s well-drawn characters, but the journey of the protagonists across a future America that is at once reimagined, yet recognizable. Sure to connect with anyone who has searched for their purpose in life and a place to belong."
– Ginger Smith, author of The Rush's Edge

 

Folks who like it say: